Total 286 Blogs

Created by - Stanley Avery

What is Dynamic Multipoint VPN (DMVPN)?

If you're interested in the IT world, there's a good chance you've heard of DMVPN. But what is it? What is it used for? In this blog post, we'll take a look at DMVPN and explain what it is and how it works. So if you're interested in learning more about this critical networking technology, keep reading! What is DMVPN? A virtual private network, or VPN, is a way for individuals or businesses to maintain internet privacy and security. It does this by creating an encrypted connection between a user's device and the website they're accessing. This means that any third party intercepting information being exchanged will not be able to decipher it. VPNs can also change a user's perceived location by routing their internet traffic through a different server, allowing them to access geographically restricted content. Now, let's talk about DMVPN in particular. It combines traditional VPN technology and dynamically addressed networks like mGRE (Multipoint GRE) tunnels. It allows for easier setup and management of multiple sites connecting to each other through VPN tunnels, making it particularly useful for larger businesses with multiple offices. By leveraging mGRE tunnels, DMVPN also allows for more efficient use of network resources as compared to static addressing methods. For further information on DMVPN, you can take a look at our course at orhanergun.net. What is DMVPN Used For? A DMVPN is a networking solution that allows for secure communication between multiple sites as well as remote users. This type of network offers more flexibility and scalability than traditional VPNs, as it doesn't require pre-configured connections or static IP addresses. Additionally, it allows for dynamic routing and support for multicast traffic to optimize network performance. As such, it is often used by companies with multiple offices or a mobile workforce that need efficient and secure communication capabilities. It can also connect multiple campuses or locations in educational settings or government institutions. How Does a DMVPN Work? A DMVPN uses tunneling protocols and encrypted security measures to create virtual connections, or tunnels, between sites. These tunnels are dynamically created as needed, making them both efficient and cost-effective. A central component of a DMVPN network is a Multipoint Control Protocol (MPCP) enabled device, such as a router, which facilitates the creation and management of the tunnels. By using MPCP in conjunction with other protocol standards, such as Internet Protocol security (IPSec) and next-hop resolution protocols (NHRP), DMVPNs provide scalable and reliable communication for organizations with multiple branch offices or remote workers. Here is a data sheet for more in-depth information on Dynamic Multipoint VPNs by Cisco. Components of a DMVPN DMVPN comprises four main components: Multipoint GRE tunnels Next Hop Resolution Protocol (NHRP) IPsec encryption and routing protocols. Multipoint GRE Multipoint GRE is a component of DMVPN (Dynamic Multipoint Virtual Private Network) that allows for multiple endpoints to connect to a central hub over the internet. mGRE essentially acts as a tunnel interface, allowing traffic to flow through it securely. Unlike traditional point-to-point VPNs, mGRE allows for more flexibility and scalability regarding network connections. Additionally, mGRE can dynamically adapt to changes in the network, making it an efficient and reliable option for businesses and organizations with complex networking needs. Next Hop Resolution Protocol (NHRP) The Next Hop Resolution Protocol is a component that helps to simplify routing within a VPN network by providing dynamic mapping and resolution of next-hop IP addresses. NHRP allows for efficient use of network resources, as it eliminates the need for static configuration or periodic manual updates. It also helps improve security, as it enables dynamically-assigned IP addresses to create more anonymous connections. IPsec Encryption The IPsec Encryption component of DMVPN acts as a secure tunnel for data transmission. When enabled, it encrypts all traffic before it is sent over the Internet, ensuring that it cannot be intercepted or read by unauthorized parties. This added layer of protection is essential for sensitive information like financial transactions or personal records. In addition to encryption, IPsec also provides authentication to verify the identity of network devices and prevent man-in-the-middle attacks. Along with other components such as dynamic routing and NHRP, IPsec Encryption helps to make DMVPN a highly effective and secure networking solution. Routing Protocols Routing protocols are a vital component in a DMVPN network. These protocols enable dynamic routing, which automatically adapts as network changes occur. They also allow for redundancy and failover, ensuring that data can still be transmitted even if a portion of the network goes down. Two standard routing protocols used in DMVPNs are OSPF and EIGRP. Both provide fast convergence and support for IPv4 and IPv6 addresses, making them versatile options for networking environments. Summary DMVPN is a critical networking technology that has many applications in the business world. By understanding what it is and how it works, you can see how it could be used in your organization. Are you ready to implement a DMVPN network? Let's check our network certification courses and learn DMVPN and more!

Published - Sun, 06 Nov 2022

Created by - Stanley Avery

BPDU Guard Explained: What is it? Why do we need it?

In networking, there are a variety of important protocols that help devices communicate with each other. One such protocol is called the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP), which helps manage the flow of traffic on a network. There is an optional feature of STP called BPDU Guard, which we'll explain in this post. Let's take a closer look! Before Explaining BPDU Guard: What is the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)? The Spanning Tree Protocol, or STP, is a network protocol that helps to prevent network loops in a switch infrastructure. Without STP, packet traffic would continually circulate through the network, causing it to crash.  STP works by creating a loop-free logical topology and selectively blocking ports to eliminate potential loop paths. This allows for redundant links in the network while preventing harmful loops from forming. STP operates at the data link layer of the OSI model and can be useful for both Ethernet and non-Ethernet networks.  In addition to STP, there are other protocols that serve similar functionality, such as Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) and Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP). Understanding the basics of STP is essential before diving into topics like BPDU Guard, which builds upon and enhances the functionality of STP in certain scenarios. BPDU Guard: What is it? BPDU Guard is a security feature found in multiple networking devices. It helps to prevent attacks on a network by blocking Bridge Protocol Data Units (BPDUs) that are sent from unauthorized devices. BPDUs are used in the Spanning Tree Protocol, which helps to create a loop-free network, but they can also be used for malicious purposes.  When BPDU Guard is enabled, it will immediately disable any port that receives a BPDU, reducing the risk of attacks on the network. In order for this feature to work properly, it should only be enabled on edge ports or those that connect to external networks, as disabling BPDUs on internal ports can disrupt communication within the network itself. Generally speaking, it is recommended to enable BPDU Guard as an added layer of security for your network. BDPU Guard vs. BDPU Filter: What is the difference? The main difference between BDPU Guard and BDPU Filter is their function. BDPU Guard is a system that actively defends against malicious attacks, while BDPU Filter acts as a preventative measure by blocking unauthorized access to certain websites or networks. In simpler terms, BDPU Guard acts like a bodyguard fighting off threats, while BDPU Filter functions more like a locked door barring entry to unwanted visitors. Both approaches serve a valuable purpose in protecting against cybersecurity threats, and many businesses choose to implement both measures for maximum security. However, it's important to note that no security system is impenetrable; regular updates and monitoring are necessary to ensure the continued protection of valuable data and resources. To sum up As you can see, BPDU Guard is a powerful tool that can help protect your network from potential attacks. While it’s not a silver bullet, it’s an important part of any layered security approach. If you have questions about deploying BPDU Guard in your own environment or want to learn more about networking best practices, you must check this course to learn everything about this topic.

Published - Sat, 05 Nov 2022

Created by - Stanley Avery

Collision Domain and Broadcast Domain

Are you familiar with the terms collision domains and broadcast domains? If not, don't worry - you're not alone. In fact, many people are unsure of the differences between these two networking concepts. This blog post will define both terms and explain their key distinctions. So, if you're curious about the differences between collision domains and broadcast domains, keep reading! What is a Collision Domain? Before discussing the differences between collision and broadcast domains, let’s discuss them separately. A collision domain refers to a network in which transmission collisions can occur. These collisions occur when two devices in the same domain attempt to send a packet simultaneously, resulting in both packets being corrupted and needing to be resent. This can lead to slower network speeds and reduced efficiency. Because each port on a hub shares the same collision domain, collisions are more common in a hub environment. However, ports on bridges, switches, and routers have their separate collision domains. How to Avoid Collision Domains? As we said before, a collision domain occurs when two computers try to send data at the same time, causing a collision on the network and resulting in lost or corrupted data. However, several steps can be taken to avoid collision domains. One solution is to use a switch instead of a hub for your network connections. Switches only send data to designated ports, whereas hubs broadcast data to all connected devices, increasing the chances of collisions. Another option is to segment large networks into smaller ones using routers, reducing the number of devices on each network and reducing the risk of collisions. Lastly, proper cable management can ensure efficient and organized data transmission, preventing network congestion and minimizing collisions. Implementing these solutions allows you to avoid collision domains and maintain a smooth-running network. What is a Broadcast Domain? A broadcast domain is a logical division of a computer network, in which all nodes can reach each other through broadcast transmission. This is typically achieved through the use of network devices such as routers and switches, which divide larger networks into smaller segments. As a result, each segment operates as its own independent broadcast domain. In addition to increasing network efficiency and performance, segmentation also improves security by limiting the spread of broadcasts and potential malware infections. However, care must be taken to ensure that appropriate communication between segments is still possible with proper configuration. Overall, understanding and implementing effective broadcast domains can greatly improve the functioning of any computer network. How to Avoid or Handle Broadcast Domains? When designing a network, one important consideration to keep in mind is the creation of broadcast domains. Broadcast domains often lead to slowed network performance and can even cause network crashes. One way to avoid broadcast domains is by properly setting up VLANs or virtual local area networks. Limiting each VLAN to a smaller group of devices can reduce the size and impact of broadcast traffic. Additionally, it may be necessary to utilize a router to separate different broadcast domains and control traffic flow between them. In cases where a broadcast domain is unintentionally created, some options for handling it include adjusting the VLAN configuration, using a Layer 3 switch, or implementing Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding. By keeping an eye on broadcast domains and taking the necessary steps to avoid or handle them, we can ensure smooth and efficient network performance. Tips: We recommend to check our this course: CCIE Enterprise Infrastructure v1.0 What are the Differences Between Collision Domains and Broadcast Domains? Both collision domains and broadcast domains are pretty common terms in the networking world. While being closely related to each other, these terms have differences between them. Let's talk about some of the differences between collision domains and broadcast domains. The Collision domain allows traffic to flow in forward and backward directions, while the Broadcast domain encompasses the entire network so that traffic can travel anywhere. Packet collision can only occur between devices in the same collision domain, while a broadcast domain is a group of computers that can communicate with each other without using a router. A collision domain contains devices from other IP subnetworks, while a broadcast domain is never limited to the specific IP subnetwork for any type of broadcast. Packet collision is a common occurrence when multiple devices are trying to transmit data on the same wire link. Broadcast domains do not have any collision because they often use a switched environment. In the collision domain, switches will break. However, in the broadcast domain, switches never break. On a router, every port has its own separate collision domain. However, all the ports on a switch or hub are usually in the same broadcast domain. Tips: We recommend to check this course about networking: Network Fundamentals Course Summary Collision domains and broadcast domains are two different ways of networking. It’s important to understand their differences so you can choose the right one for your needs. We hope this article has helped clarify any confusion and given you a better understanding of these terms. Thanks for reading!

Published - Sat, 05 Nov 2022

Created by - Stanley Avery

CompTIA Network+ Certification Exam Overview

Are you looking to obtain your CompTIA Network+ Certification? If so, this blog post is for you. In this post, we will provide an overview of the CompTIA Network+ Certification Exam. We will also discuss some of the topics that are covered on the exam. Finally, we will provide a few tips to help you prepare for the exam. So, let's get started! What Is CompTIA Network+ Certification Exam? The CompTIA Network+ exam is a globally recognized certification that proves individuals have the skills necessary to manage, troubleshoot, and secure wired and wireless network infrastructures. While there are no prerequisites for the exam, CompTIA recommends at least nine months of networking experience, including knowledge of network technologies, installation and configuration, media and topologies, management, and security. What Is the CompTIA Network+ Certification Exam Like? The exam consists of 90 multiple-choice and performance-based questions and covers topics such as: Network design and implementation Essential network devices configuration, management, and maintenance Switch and router usage for segmenting networks Examining the pros and cons of established network designs Incorporating security standards and practices into your network Network troubleshooting Assisting in the design of virtualized networks Individuals who pass the CompTIA Network+ Certificate exam show they have the ability to support the dynamic networking technology needs of organizations in various industries. Earning this certification can open up career opportunities in fields such as network administration, IT support, and cybersecurity. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the salaries for CompTIA Network+ certified personnel are between $67,000 and $92,000. Our Tips on Preparing for the CompTIA Network+ Certificate Exam: While studying for any test can be overwhelming, we have some tips to help make the process a little easier. Here are our three tips for the CompTIA Network+ Certificate exam: 1. Ensure That You Understand the Basics of Networking: Understanding networking basics is essential for passing the CompTIA Network+ Certificate Exam. The exam covers various topics, including network architecture and design, network operations and management, network security, and troubleshooting. Without a fundamental understanding of networking principles, answering questions properly and efficiently can be difficult. Additionally, having a strong foundation in networking concepts allows individuals to apply their knowledge in real-world scenarios. 2. Focus on Exam Topics: When studying for the CompTIA Network+ certificate exam, it can be tempting to try and memorize every tiny detail. However, focusing on specific exam topics can be more effective. By understanding the main concepts and skills tested on the exam, you will have a solid foundation to build upon. This also increases the likelihood that you will remember key information during the actual exam. Additionally, studying specific exam topics can help save time and eliminate unnecessary stress by allowing you to focus on what is most important. So, instead of covering every detail, focus your efforts on thoroughly grasping the major exam topics. 3. Find Yourself a Solid Course When it comes to taking the CompTIA Network+ certification exam, finding a solid study course can make all the difference. The exam covers various topics, from network technologies and infrastructure to network security and troubleshooting. A good course will provide in-depth information on these subjects and offer test-taking strategies and practice questions to help prepare you for the exam. In addition, many courses offer resources such as study guides or online forums where you can connect with other students and exchange tips and resources. Overall, finding a comprehensive study course like this can go a long way in helping you successfully pass the CompTIA Network+ certification exam. Summary The CompTIA Network+ certification is an internationally recognized validation of the technical knowledge required for a career in IT networking. It is designed for students and professionals who have at least nine months of experience in network support or administration. If you are looking to start or further your career in IT networking, this certification should be one of your top priorities. For more information on the CompTIA Network+ certification exam and how OrhanErgun can help you prepare, please visit our courses today.

Published - Sat, 05 Nov 2022

Created by - Stanley Avery

BGP Neighbors: A Quick Guide

If you're responsible for networking infrastructure, you've probably had to deal with BGP (Border Gateway Protocol).It's one of the core protocols used on the internet and can be quite complex.This post will provide a quick guide to understanding BGP neighbors. We'll cover what they are, how they are formed, and why they are important. Finally, we'll provide some tips on troubleshooting BGP neighbors. Stay tuned! What Does "BGP Neighbor" Mean? In the realm of computer networking, a BGP neighbor (often abbreviated as "NBR") refers to a router that shares a common BGP session with another router. In order for two routers to establish this connection, there must be an interface configured for BGP on both sides, and they must have matching BGP settings, such as an Autonomous System number. Once the two routers have established a BGP neighbor relationship, they exchange routing information and can communicate with each other as needed. It's important to note that just because two routers can establish a BGP neighbor relationship, it does not necessarily mean that they will exchange routing information; this depends on whether or not their respective networks have been configured to do so. In summary, a BGP neighbor is simply another router with which one has established a successful BGP session. Why Are BGP Neighbors Important? In a computer network, BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) neighbors are crucial for routing data between different autonomous systems. Network traffic can become inconsistent or even fail altogether without properly functioning BGP neighbors. As networks grow larger and more complex, it becomes increasingly important to have reliable BGP neighbors to ensure smooth communication and data transfer. In addition, establishing a strong BGP neighbor relationship can help prevent security breaches and enhance network resilience in the event of a failure or attack. While managing BGP neighbors may seem like a tedious task, the benefits they provide make the effort well worth it in the long run. BGP Neighbor States: In order for routers to exchange information and make routing decisions, they must establish a BGP session with their neighboring routers. This connection progresses through several "states," including Idle, Connect, Active, OpenSent, OpenConfirm, and Established. Idle: Idle is a BGP neighbor state, meaning the peering session is up and operational, but no routes are exchanged. It's essentially a "ready to go" state and usually happens when both routers have been powered on and initialized, but no routes have yet been exchanged. It is the first stage of the BGP finite state machine. Connect: When BGP is in this state, it initiates a TCP connection. If the 3-way TCP handshake completes successfully, the established BGP Session process will reset the ConnectRetryTimer and send an Open message to the neighbor. After that, it changes to the OpenSent State. Active: If the ConnectRetry timer expires before the connect stage is complete, a new TCP connection is attempted, and the state changes to Active after resetting the ConnectRetry timer. However, If any other input is received during this process, the state immediately becomes Idle. OpenSent: OpenSent is a BGP neighbor state in which the router has sent an OPEN message to the neighbor but has not yet received a KEEPALIVE message in response. The router will remain in this state until it either receives a KEEPALIVE message from the neighbor or times out waiting for one. OpenConfirm: OpenConfirm describes a state when BGP neighbors have exchanged messages, established that they can communicate with one another, and have agreed to exchange routes. The state is moved to the Established state. Established: Established is the state when a TCP session has been successfully established, and both endpoints can exchange messages. Once in this state, the routers will continue to exchange messages until one side decides to tear down the session. Final Words That’s a quick overview of some of the most important terms related to BGP neighbors. We hope this was helpful! If you want to learn more or need help configuring your routers for optimal BGP performance, click here and watch CCIE Enterprise Infrastructure course that covers BGP topics.

Published - Sun, 30 Oct 2022

Created by - Stanley Avery

Most Common BGP Communities

If you're interested in networking, then you've probably heard of the term "BGP community." But what are they? And what do they do? In this blog post, we'll take a look at some of the most well-known BGP communities. We'll also discuss their functions and how they can be useful. So if you're curious about BGP communities and want to learn more, keep reading! or You can check our BGP training course. What is BGP Community? BGP community is a BGP attribute that can be attached to a route to provide additional information and allow for more granular control in BGP routing decisions. BGP community values are optional and transitive, meaning they can be passed along from one BGP speaker to the next. This allows for increased flexibility and customizability in BGP routing policies. BGP communities can also be used for hierarchical or organizational purposes, such as identifying routes belonging to a particular service provider or network segment. What is the Purpose of a BGP Community? The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is a fundamental component of the internet. It is responsible for routing traffic across networks and determining the most efficient path for data to travel. However, BGP was not originally designed to support complex network configurations, leading to issues such as suboptimal routing decisions and security vulnerabilities. This is where BGP communities come in. A BGP community is a group of network nodes that share a common policy, allowing for better control and management of traffic on the Internet. This can include setting preferred paths for certain types of traffic, controlling the advertisement of routes to certain nodes, and defining actions to take if certain conditions are met. BGP communities offer increased flexibility and customization for network routing policies. By assigning a community tag to an advertisement, network providers can apply custom configurations for specific types of traffic. This allows for more granular control over traffic flow and optimization based on factors like customer contracts or service level agreements. BGP communities also allow for the application of policies across multiple networks, allowing providers to easily coordinate and manage their routing strategies. In addition, BGP communities can be used to enhance security by limiting the dissemination of sensitive information to specific nodes or groups. This helps to enhance security by limiting access to this sensitive information and preventing it from being inadvertently leaked outside of the assigned community. Most Well-Known BGP Communities When it comes to Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), communities are sets of route attributes that can be used for various purposes, such as routing and traffic engineering. The most commonly known BGP communities include No Export, No Advertise, and Graceful Shutdown. These communities provide highly valuable functions in networking and allow for more efficient routing decisions. 1. No Export In the BGP routing protocol, a No Export community is used to prevent an announcement from being exported to any external BGP peers. This ensures that traffic intended for the local autonomous system stays within that system and does not get accidentally propagated outside of it. The No Export community can be applied both inbound and outbound on BGP announcements, allowing for fine-tuned control over which routes are shared with external peers. This can also be useful in troubleshooting routing issues or maintaining network security. 2. No Advertise The No Advertise BGP community is a configuration option for Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) that tells a BGP speaker not to advertise a particular route to its neighbors. This feature can be useful in preventing certain routes from propagating to external networks while still allowing them to be used locally. It can also be helpful in troubleshooting network issues or controlling traffic flow. The No Advertise community is just one of many optional BGP attributes that can be used to fine tune network routing. 3. Graceful Shutdown The Graceful Shutdown BGP community is used to control the behavior of a router during BGP session shutdown. When applied, it allows for the orderly withdrawal of routes and graceful closure of BGP peering sessions. This helps to minimize network disruption and ensure that all necessary updates are properly propagated in the network. The Graceful Shutdown community can be applied to a specific peer or globally, allowing for fine-tuned control over how the shutdown is handled. This can be a useful tool for facilitating network maintenance or making changes to routing configurations. Final Words The BGP community is a powerful tool to manage routing in your network. Using them lets you control how prefixes are handled and which routes are accepted or rejected. This allows for more fine-tuned traffic management and can help improve performance and stability. We encourage you to try them if you’re not already using BGP communities. They may just be the tool you need to run your network like a well-oiled machine. Have you ever used BGP communities in your network? What tips do you have for others who want to start using them? You can learn about lots of BGP Communities in our CCIE Enterprise Infrastructure course.

Published - Sun, 30 Oct 2022

Created by - Stanley Avery

IPv6 Address Types

There are several different IPv6 address types, each with its own unique properties. In this blog post, we'll explain the different types of IPv6 addresses and give examples of how they can be used. So, if you're interested in learning more about IPv6 addressing, keep reading! What is IPv6 Address? Why do we need it? The Internet Protocol (IP) address is a unique identifier assigned to every device connected to the internet. It allows for communication and data transfer between these devices. The current version in use, IPv4, can support a maximum of 4.3 billion addresses. However, as more devices are added to the internet – particularly with the rise of the Internet of Things – this limit has been reached and exhausted. This is where IPv6 comes in. It can support significantly more addresses – 340 trillion trillion trillion, to be exact – allowing for continued growth and connectivity on the internet. In addition, it offers improved security measures and better network management capabilities. Overall, IPv6 is necessary to accommodate the increasing number of devices connecting to the internet and ensure smooth communication between them. On the other hand, there are a couple of IPv6 address types you should know. IPv6 Address Types When it comes to IPv6 addressing, there are three distinct types: unicast, anycast, and multicast. Let's talk about these IPv6 address types separately: IPv6 Address Type #1: Unicast In IPv6, the unicast address is used to identify a single network interface. Each node on an IPv6 network has at least one unique unicast address, which can be either manually configured or automatically generated using stateless address autoconfiguration. Unicast addresses are also divided into various categories based on their intended use, such as global unicast addresses for communication across multiple networks and link-local unicast addresses for communication within a single network. IPv6 Address Type #2: Anycast In anycast, a single IP address is assigned to multiple devices, with traffic being routed to the nearest device. This allows for increased efficiency and redundancy, eliminating the need for separate IP addresses for each device and offering backup options if one device fails. Anycast can be particularly useful for services such as DNS servers, as it allows for faster response times and improved reliability. IPv6 Address Type #3: Multicast Multicast addresses allow for a single packet to be sent to multiple recipients simultaneously, unlike unicast, which sends data to one recipient at a time. This can be useful in situations where a group needs to receive the same information, such as in-network meetings or online classes. In IPv6, multicast addresses use the prefix FF00::/8 and can have up to eight groups of four hexadecimal digits each. Final Words If you are looking for more information on IPv6 address types or want to learn about networking in general, our courses have lots of helpful content for you. We offer a range of services, from teaching you the basics of networking to helping you design and implement a network that meets your specific needs. Contact us today to get started!

Published - Sun, 30 Oct 2022

Created by - Stanley Avery

BGP MED Attribute

In networking, the BGP MED attribute is an important part of the routing process. But what is it, and why is it important? This post will explain the purpose of the MED attribute, and we'll also take a look at some common use cases for this powerful feature. So if you're looking to learn more about BGP MED, you've come to the right place! What is BGP MED Attribute? The BGP MED attribute, also known as the Multi-Exit Discriminator, is a metric used by Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) to determine the best path for routing traffic between autonomous systems. The value of the MED attribute can be set by network administrators, allowing for the customization of routing decisions. In addition to manually setting a value for the MED attribute, it can also be automatically propagated from one autonomous system to another. This allows for greater flexibility and adaptability in BGP routing decisions. Overall, the BGP MED attribute plays an important role in optimizing network traffic flow across multiple autonomous systems. How is a MED Metric Advertised? There are several rules to consider when a MED metric is advertised: First and foremost, a more specific metric will cancel out a less specific one. For example, if you have two metrics of different groups, the group-specific metric takes precedence over the global BGP metric. Likewise, if you have peer-specific and other global metrics, the peer-specific metrics override both others. A routing policy's metric definition takes priority over a metric-out statement. Any defined metric will take precedence over a metric received from a route. If a MED metric is not associated with a received route, and if a metric value is not configured, no metric is advertised. If you do not set a metric value, it will be automatically set to zero when advertising an active route. BGP MED vs Local Preference As we mentioned before, BGP MED, or Multi-exit Discriminator, is a BGP attribute that allows a network to inform its BGP neighbors about preferred entry points into the network. Local Preference, on the other hand, is an attribute used to influence routes within a single BGP autonomous system. In other words, BGP MED influences which BGP neighbor a network will use to reach a destination, while Local Preference influences the choice of exit point within a particular network. BGP MED can also be considered a more globally significant attribute, as it can influence routing decisions for all BGP neighbors, while Local Preference only affects choices made within one autonomous system. Both attributes are important in determining BGP routing decisions, but they serve different purposes and should not be confused with one another. What are some common uses for BGP MED? One common use case for BGP MED is when different ISPs connect to a provider through different points of presence with varying levels of available bandwidth. In this scenario, the provider could assign a higher BGP MED value to the slower PoPs to influence external peers to primarily use the higher bandwidth connections. Another potential use case is for directing traffic towards specific data centers in cases where there are multiple options available within a geographical region. By assigning a lower BGP MED value to the preferred data center, external peers may be more likely to route traffic toward it. BGP MED should be used carefully, as it can lead to unbalanced traffic distribution and potential network congestion if not implemented properly. Final Words The BGP MED attribute is a useful tool for networking. By setting the MED value on your border gateway protocol (BGP) advertisements, you can tell other networks how highly you think they should route traffic to your network. This could be helpful if you have multiple connections to different providers and want to make sure that traffic from one provider is routed through another provider’s network as efficiently as possible. Have you tried using the BGP MED attribute in your own networking? Before, you must to check our CCIE Enterprise Infrastructure course about BGP MED.

Published - Sun, 30 Oct 2022

Created by - Stanley Avery

Best Certification for Networking

Are you looking to get certified in networking? It can be tough to determine the best certification for networking for you.In this blog post, we'll look at some of the most popular certifications and discuss the benefits of each.We'll also help you decide which is the best certification for networking for you.So, if you're interested in networking certification, keep reading! 1. CCIE Enterprise Infrastructure Certificate The Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert Enterprise Infrastructure (CCIE) certification is a highly-regarded, expert-level credential for professionals in the networking field. It is considered the best certification for networking for those who want to take a step further. This certification demonstrates an individual's skills and knowledge in planning, operating, and troubleshooting enterprise infrastructure. Earning the CCIE Enterprise Infrastructure certification also opens up opportunities for career advancement and higher salaries. You can find a training program for this certificate here. 2. CCIE Service Provider Certificate The CCIE Service Provider (CCIE SP) certification is a highly sought-after certification for professionals in the service provider industry. This certification demonstrates a deep understanding of service provider principles, technologies, and architecture. Obtaining the CCIE SP certification requires passing both a written exam and an advanced hands-on lab exam, ensuring that holders of this certification have the skills needed to excel in their field. The CCIE SP certification enables individuals to advance their careers, providing opportunities for promotions and job advancements. Companies also benefit from certified employees, as they can confidently trust their team's expertise and abilities. If you want a comprehensive course for the CCIE SP exam, you should take a look at this course. 3. CCDE Certificate The Cisco Certified Design Expert (CCDE) certification is an advanced-level certification for professionals who design and implement complex network solutions. It is sometimes considered the best certification for networking for advanced engineers. This certification requires both hands-on experience and theoretical knowledge in network design and implementation. The benefits of obtaining the CCDE include career advancement opportunities, increased salary potential, and recognition as a top networking expert by employers and colleagues. It also enables professionals to stay current with rapidly evolving technologies and industry best practices. For those who want an extensive CCDE course, you can click here. 4. Cisco ISE Training Certificate The Cisco ISE Training Certificate is designed to provide students with the skills and knowledge necessary to successfully implement, manage, and maintain the Cisco Identity Services Engine platform. This certification helps train participants to better manage network access, enhance security measures, and improve compliance management. The program consists of multiple courses and hands-on experience, allowing individuals to develop a comprehensive understanding of the Cisco ISE platform. In addition to enhancing job performance, holding this certification can also lead to career advancement opportunities within the networking field. Here you can find one of the most comprehensive courses for Cisco ISE training. 5. CCNP ENCOR 350-401 Certification The CCNP ENCOR 350-401 certification, also known as the Implementing and Operating Cisco Enterprise Network Core Technologies exam, is a professional-level certification for network engineers. It is the most popular and sought-after certificate, if not the best certification for networking. It demonstrates an individual's expertise in areas such as network infrastructure, automation, security, and programmability. Earning this certification can have numerous benefits for both the individual and their employer. It shows that the individual has dedicated time and effort to expand their knowledge and skills in networking technology. In turn, this can lead to career advancement opportunities or a higher salary. You can find one of the best courses for the CCNP ENCOR 350-401 exam here. 6. Cisco SD-WAN Certification The Cisco SD-WAN certification is designed for professionals who want expertise in designing, deploying, and managing Cisco's software-defined wide-area network solutions. It might be the best networking certificate in wide-area network solutions. These solutions offer a more flexible and secure way to connect enterprise networks, making them especially valuable for organizations with multiple branch offices or remote workers. Earning the Cisco SD-WAN certification demonstrates an in-depth understanding of these solutions and their capabilities, giving professionals a valuable skill set in today's rapidly evolving technology landscape. Benefits of this certification include increased job opportunities, higher earning potential, and the ability to stay ahead of industry trends and advancements. This course will help you prepare for the Cisco SD-WAN exam without a problem. Final Words If you are looking for a certification in networking, our courses will help you prepare for these exams. We have the best instructors who will guide you through every step of your preparation. Our online platform allows you to access all the course materials and practice tests whenever and wherever you want. Also, we are happy to help you pick the best certificate for networking for yourself. Get started today and become a certified network engineer!

Published - Sun, 30 Oct 2022